Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10316/100848
Title: Reducing Soil Permeability Using Bacteria-Produced Biopolymer
Authors: Mendonça, Amanda 
Morais, Paula V. 
Pires, Ana Cecília 
Chung, Ana Paula 
Oliveira, Paulo J. Venda 
Keywords: biopolymer; soil stabilisation xanthan gum; sandy soil
Issue Date: 2021
Project: FCT projects ERAMIN2 REVIVING 
project PTDC/CTA-AMB/31820/2017 
FCT UIDB/00285/2020 
BIORECOVER H2020 grant agreement 821096 
project POCI-01-0145-FEDER-028382 
UIDB/04029/2020 
Serial title, monograph or event: Applied Sciences (Switzerland)
Volume: 11
Issue: 16
Abstract: The building of civil engineering structures on some soils requires their stabilisation. Although Portland cement is the most used substance to stabilise soils, it is associated with a lot of environmental concerns. Therefore, it is very pertinent to study more sustainable alternative methodologies to replace the use of cement. Thus, this work analyses the ability of the more sustainable xanthan-like biopolymer, produced by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Faro439 strain (LabXLG), to reduce the permeability of a sandy soil. Additionally, the effectiveness of this LabXLG is compared with the use of a commercial xanthan gum (XG) and cement for various hydraulic gradients and curing times. The results show that a treatment with either type of XG can be used to replace the cement over the short term (curing time less than 14 days), although a greater level of effectiveness is obtained with the use of the commercial XG, due to its higher level of purity. The soil treatment with LabXLG creates a network of fibres that link the soil particles, while the commercial XG fills the voids with a homogeneous paste.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10316/100848
ISSN: 2076-3417
DOI: 10.3390/app11167278
Rights: openAccess
Appears in Collections:I&D ISISE - Artigos em Revistas Internacionais
I&D CEMMPRE - Artigos em Revistas Internacionais
FCTUC Eng.Mecânica - Artigos em Revistas Internacionais

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