Title: Forms and Functions of Aggression in Adolescents: Validation of the Portuguese Version of the Peer Conflict Scale
Authors: Vagos, Paula 
Rijo, Daniel 
Santos, Isabel M. 
Marsee, Monica A. 
Keywords: Aggression;Assessment;Psychometrics;Adolescence
Issue Date: 2014
Project: This work was funded by a research scholarship by Fundação para a Ciência e Tecnologia, Portugal and the European Social Fund (SFRH / BPD / 72299 / 2010) 
Abstract: Aggression in adolescence may assume different forms and functions, and is often associated with maladjustment. To adequately assess aggression in adolescence, instruments need to evaluate both its forms and its functions, as is the case with the Peer Conflict Scale. This research presents and evaluates the Portuguese version of this instrument, and evaluates levels of aggression in an adolescent community sample (n = 785; 63.6 % female, mean age of 15.97 years old). The four factor structure originally proposed for the instrument (i.e. proactive overt, reactive overt, proactive relational and reactive relational aggression) represented a satisfactory solution for the data, and for both girls and boys. Results also have shown adequate reliability. Regarding levels of aggression, boys reported being overall more aggressive than girls. When aggression is impulsive/ reactive, both boys and girls practice its overt form. It is only when the aggression is pondered upon (proactive) that boys and girls chose to use different forms of aggression. Accurately evaluating different forms and functions of aggression has implications for designing, implementing and evaluating adequate and tailored interventions.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10316/46649
DOI: 10.1007/s10862-014-9421-6
Rights: openAccess
Appears in Collections:FPCEUC - Artigos em Revistas Internacionais

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