Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10316/96608
Title: Covid-19 pandemic: the reproduction and contestation of securitisation of asylum seekers, immigrants and Afro-descendants in the Portuguese media
Authors: Santos, Rita
Santos, Sofia José 
Keywords: Media; Covid-19; Othering; Securitisation; De-othering; Portugal
Issue Date: 2021
Publisher: DiSLL, Università degli Studi di Padova
Project: POCI-01-0145-FEDER-029997 
PTDC/CPO-CPO/29997/2017 
Serial title, monograph or event: From the European South
Issue: 9
Place of publication or event: Padova
Abstract: This article deals with discourses about the Covid-19 pandemic in the Portuguese media from 2020-2021. Through thematic qualitative content analysis, we explore how migrants, refugees/asylum seekers and Afro-descendants – that is, racialised people who are often read as non-Portuguese – have been portrayed by the media, and the idea of ‘non-Portugueseness’, constructed in relation to this phenomenon. The pandemic is an interesting context in which to analyse discourses reproducing the us/them divide, but also the ‘us’, given the heightened role security imaginaries have played in framing and reacting upon the pandemic. In this analysis, we examine (de)securitisation moves present in the Portuguese media when representing refugees/asylum seekers, immigrants and Afro-descendants, focussing on three main tropes: securitising said groups, explaining and deconstructing securitisation of these people, and shedding light on the threats and vulnerabilities faced by them.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10316/96608
ISSN: 2531-4130
Rights: openAccess
Appears in Collections:I&D CES - Artigos em Revistas Internacionais

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
Covid-19 pandemic_the reproduction and contestation of.pdf253.88 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
Show full item record

Page view(s)

21
checked on Dec 24, 2021

Download(s)

5
checked on Dec 24, 2021

Google ScholarTM

Check


This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons