Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10316/90548
Title: Eurocity: From Political Construction to Local Demand… Or Vice-Versa?
Authors: González Gómez, Teresa
Domínguez-Gómez, J. Andrés
Pinto, Hugo 
Keywords: Eurocity; Governance; Local development; Sustainable development; Transborder regions
Issue Date: Nov-2019
Publisher: MDPI
Project: BOJA Nº99, 24 May 2018 
DL57/2016/CP1341/CT0013 
Serial title, monograph or event: Sustainability
Volume: 11
Issue: 22
Place of publication or event: Basel
Abstract: This study presents a diagnostic analysis of the concept of the Eurocity. It aims to compare the initial intentions of the concept with its actual results from the perspective of a sustainable local development approach, particularly assessing the attention given to local governance and its potential for boosting this development paradigm. To this end, a range of internal documents and press reports of the Guadiana Eurocity were analyzed, and 15 in-depth interviews and one focus group were conducted with the main stakeholders involved in implementing local development policy in order to uncover the cognitive structure of their collective discourse and the potentials and expectations of the Eurocity. The results showed that the Guadiana Eurocity seemed to be the cross-border and European integration entity with the most legitimacy among these municipalities for carrying out sustainable local development strategies. Its structure and closeness to residents’ daily lives, however, were not sufficient guarantees of its success.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10316/90548
ISSN: 2071-1050
DOI: 10.3390/su11226217
Rights: openAccess
Appears in Collections:I&D CES - Artigos em Revistas Internacionais

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