Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10316/20273
Title: Haemosporidian parasites in communities of southwestern European reedbeds : their passerine hosts and their vectors
Authors: Ventim, Rita 
Orientador: Ramos, Jaime Albino
Mendes, Luísa
Pérez-Tris, Javier
Keywords: Passeriformes -- Portugal; Parasitas das aves
Issue Date: 30-Mar-2012
Citation: VENTIM, Rita - Haemosporidian parasites in communities of southwestern European reedbeds : their passerine hosts and their vectors. Coimbra : [s.n.], 2011
Project: info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/FCT/SFRH/SFRH/BD/28930/2006/PT/AVIAN MALARIA TRANSMISSION IN COMMUNITIES OF WETLAND PASSERINES 
Abstract: Haemosporidian parasites of the genera Haemoproteus and Plasmodium infect birds of several different families all over the world, using dipteran insects as vectors. However, the factors affecting their transmission patterns are not well known. This study examined haemoparasite infections in communities of south-western European reed beds. It characterized infection prevalence and intensity in several passerine species and investigated haemoparasite specificity, the structure of the host-parasite interactions and the geographical configuration of parasite assemblages. The distribution of local mosquito species, potential vectors of Plasmodium spp., was analysed and their feeding preferences were determined. Community studies involving several bird and mosquito species are important to understand the transmission patterns of haemoparasites. To my knowledge, this is the first study of this kind in Europe. Four Portuguese red beds (Montemor-o-Velho, Tornada, Santo André and Vilamoura) were studied, including a community of 13 passerine species: six migratory warblers (four breeding, one wintering and one passing migrant), one resident warbler, two resident sparrows, two exotic finches and two exotic weavers. From 2007 to 2009, 1353 birds and over 3700 female mosquitoes from 10 species were sampled. These samples were diagnosed for haemoparasite infections using molecular techniques designed to detect the presence of haemosporidian DNA. Microscopy was used to calculate infection intensity in autochthonous birds. Patterns of infection prevalence and intensity were characterized in resident and migratory bird species, in 2007 and 2008. 34.5% of the sampled birds were infected, all with low level parasitemias compatible with the chronic stage of infection. At the genus level, Plasmodium spp. infected more species and reached a higher overall prevalence. Prevalence varied between bird species and was affected by different factors in each host species, according to the host’s biology. Age was important to explain prevalence in the Reed Warbler Acrocephalus scirpaceus, reflecting that the sampled adults had already migrated to Africa and contacted with two different parasite faunas, accumulating infections from their wintering and breeding grounds; whereas yearlings had only contacted with the local parasite community. Prevalence varied significantly with season for the resident Cetti’s Warbler Cettia cetti, which was more infected during autumn and winter. A lower food availability in the reed beds during those seasons may weaken these birds and make them more prone to infection. This tendency was more subtle (not statistically significant) in the resident House Sparrow Passer domesticus, a more generalist bird that spends less time in the reed bed and can feed on other food sources; prevalence in this species only showed yearly differences. The host-specificity of the parasite lineages was analyzed and compared with other cases described in the literature. Of the nine lineages of Haemoproteus and 15 of Plasmodium that were found, only ten Plasmodium lineages had confirmed local transmission. Each lineage showed a specific host preference. Host-specialist lineages did not always share hosts with generalist lineages, forming a non-nested pattern of interactions. Plasmodium SGS1 was the most prevalent lineage in the sampled species and also the most host-generalist. In general, the lineages with a wider host range were also the most prevalent, confirming that the ability to infect more host species increases a parasite’s prevalence in its entire host range. One lineage (H. MW1) appeared to be significantly more host-generalist in the study sites than in previous studies from the literature. This suggests that caution is needed when accessing a parasite’s specialization, since it can depend on the type of host species that are sampled. To see if haemoparasite assemblages are geographically structured along the two main European flyways, the parasites of Reed Warblers and Great Reed Warblers Acrocephalus arundinaceus found in the four study sites were compared with those found in four eastern-European sites. The four Portuguese sites represented the western European flyway, while the eastern flyway was represented by four sites in Sweden, Bulgaria, Romania and Russia, taken from the literature. 32 lineages were documented for the two host species in Europe, 14 of which exclusively found in the eastern flyway, 3 exclusively found in western sites and the remaining 15 occurring along both flyways. When sites were compared two by two, nor the distance between sites nor the flyway the sites belonged to was not enough to characterize the similarity between the site’s parasite assemblages. In these host species, haemoparasite assemblages show little geographical structure throughout Europe, so the migratory movements of these hosts are not enough to homogenize their parasite assemblages along their flyways. Perhaps host-generalist lineages, dispersing through the combined movements of several host species, cause this lack of structure. For this reason, local adaptation to haemoparasites seems to constitute a poor selective agent in the evolution and maintenance of birds’ migratory connectivity. To test if the exotic passerine species had benefitted from a release from haemoparasites, their infections were compared with those found in six local bird species. The exotic birds had less infecting lineages and a lower overall prevalence, but this difference was not significant once phylogeny was controlled for. Two local Plasmodium lineages infected the exotic species: the generalist P. SGS1 was the most prevalent lineage in the native species, so it could be expected to be present in the exotics at random. P. PADOM01 was rarer in the sampled community, but was present in native sparrows (phylogenetically close to the infected exotic species), so its colonization of the exotic host must be aided by its specialization in Passeroids. Therefore, the enemy release hypothesis did not seem to apply to the haemoparasites The host-specificity of the parasite lineages was analyzed and compared with other cases described in the literature. Of the nine lineages of Haemoproteus and 15 of Plasmodium that were found, only ten Plasmodium lineages had confirmed local transmission. Each lineage showed a specific host preference. Host-specialist lineages did not always share hosts with generalist lineages, forming a non-nested pattern of interactions. Plasmodium SGS1 was the most prevalent lineage in the sampled species and also the most host-generalist. In general, the lineages with a wider host range were also the most prevalent, confirming that the ability to infect more host species increases a parasite’s prevalence in its entire host range. One lineage (H. MW1) appeared to be significantly more host-generalist in the study sites than in previous studies from the literature. This suggests that caution is needed when accessing a parasite’s specialization, since it can depend on the type of host species that are sampled. To see if haemoparasite assemblages are geographically structured along the two main European flyways, the parasites of Reed Warblers and Great Reed Warblers Acrocephalus arundinaceus found in the four study sites were compared with those found in four eastern-European sites. The four Portuguese sites represented the western European flyway, while the eastern flyway was represented by four sites in Sweden, Bulgaria, Romania and Russia, taken from the literature. 32 lineages were documented for the two host species in Europe, 14 of which exclusively found in the eastern flyway, 3 exclusively found in western sites and the remaining 15 occurring along both flyways. When sites were compared two by two, nor the distance between sites nor the flyway the sites belonged to was not enough to characterize the similarity between the site’s parasite assemblages. In these host species, haemoparasite assemblages show little geographical structure throughout Europe, so the migratory movements of these hosts are not enough to homogenize their parasite assemblages along their flyways. Perhaps host-generalist lineages, dispersing through the combined movements of several host species, cause this lack of structure. For this reason, local adaptation to haemoparasites seems to constitute a poor selective agent in the evolution and maintenance of birds’ migratory connectivity. To test if the exotic passerine species had benefitted from a release from haemoparasites, their infections were compared with those found in six local bird species. The exotic birds had less infecting lineages and a lower overall prevalence, but this difference was not significant once phylogeny was controlled for. Two local Plasmodium lineages infected the exotic species: the generalist P. SGS1 was the most prevalent lineage in the native species, so it could be expected to be present in the exotics at random. P. PADOM01 was rarer in the sampled community, but was present in native sparrows (phylogenetically close to the infected exotic species), so its colonization of the exotic host must be aided by its specialization in Passeroids. Therefore, the enemy release hypothesis did not seem to apply to the haemoparasitesof these exotic species, as they were infected by local haemoparasites in the same way as the local host species. The spatial distribution of local vectors of Plasmodium sp. was investigated, together with their relations both with parasites and with birds (through the mosquito’s feeding preferences). In three of the study sites, the most abundant mosquito species were Culex pipiens, Cx. theileri and Ochlerotatus caspius. In the Tornada site, Coquilletidia richiardii was very abundant, but Cx. theileri and Oc. caspius were absent. Unengorged Cx. pipiens and Cx. theileri were infected by two locally transmitted lineages, P. SGS1 and P. SYAT05 (respectively), suggesting those mosquitoes as competent vectors of these lineages. These species’ abundance was significantly different among sites, which may help to explain the observed differences in the prevalence of P. SGS1. This lineage was detected in the most abundant mosquito species and reached a high prevalence in the most abundant passerine species; possibly, this parasite needs abundant hosts in all phases of its cycle to keep a good reservoir of infection in all its stages. In an experiment using CO2 and animal baited traps at Tornada, Cq. richiardii appeared to be an opportunistic feeder. Cx. pipiens appeared to be mammophilic (contrarily to previous descriptions), perhaps because the used avian bait was unknown to the local mosquitoes. The identification of blood meal donors points to the Spotless Starling Sturnus unicolor as a possible preferential target in that site.
Parasitas hemosporídeos dos géneros Haemoproteus e Plasmodium infectam aves pertencentes a diversas famílias em todo o mundo, usando insectos dípteros como vectores. No entanto, ainda não se conhecem bem os factores que afectam os seus padrões de transmissão. Este estudo examinou infecções por hemoparasitas em comunidades de caniçais do sudoeste europeu. A prevalência e intensidade das infecções foram caracterizadas em várias espécies de passeriformes e investigou-se a especificidade de hospedeiro dos parasitas, a estrutura das relações hospedeiro-parasita e a configuração geográfica das comunidades de parasitas. Analisou-se a distribuição das espécies de mosquito locais (potenciais vectores de Plasmodium spp.) e as suas preferências alimentares. Estudos a nível das comunidades, envolvendo várias espécies de aves e de mosquitos, são importantes para o entender os padrões de transmissão dos hemoparasitas. Tanto quanto eu sei, este é o primeiro estudo dessa natureza feito na Europa. Investigaram-se quatro caniçais portugueses (Montemos-o-Velho, Tornada, Santo André e Vilamoura), abrangendo uma comunidade de 13 espécies de passeriformes: seis felosas migradoras (quatro nidificantes, uma invernante e uma migradora de passagem), uma felosa residente, dois pardais residentes, dois fringilídeos exóticos e dois tecelões exóticos. De 2007 a Parasitas hemosporídeos dos géneros Haemoproteus e Plasmodium infectam aves pertencentes a diversas famílias em todo o mundo, usando insectos dípteros como vectores. No entanto, ainda não se conhecem bem os factores que afectam os seus padrões de transmissão. Este estudo examinou infecções por hemoparasitas em comunidades de caniçais do sudoeste europeu. A prevalência e intensidade das infecções foram caracterizadas em várias espécies de passeriformes e investigou-se a especificidade de hospedeiro dos parasitas, a estrutura das relações hospedeiro-parasita e a configuração geográfica das comunidades de parasitas. Analisou-se a distribuição das espécies de mosquito locais (potenciais vectores de Plasmodium spp.) e as suas preferências alimentares. Estudos a nível das comunidades, envolvendo várias espécies de aves e de mosquitos, são importantes para o entender os padrões de transmissão dos hemoparasitas. Tanto quanto eu sei, este é o primeiro estudo dessa natureza feito na Europa. Investigaram-se quatro caniçais portugueses (Montemos-o-Velho, Tornada, Santo André e Vilamoura), abrangendo uma comunidade de 13 espécies de passeriformes: seis felosas migradoras (quatro nidificantes, uma invernante e uma migradora de passagem), uma felosa residente, dois pardais residentes, dois fringilídeos exóticos e dois tecelões exóticos. De 2007 a2009, amostraram-se 1353 pássaros e mais de 3700 mosquitos fêmea. Todas estas amostras foram analisadas para diagnosticar infecções de hemoparasitas, usando técnicas de biologia molecular que detectam a presença do ADN do parasita. Recorreu-se à microscopia para calcular a intensidade das infecções em aves autóctones. Caracterizaram-se os padrões de prevalência e intensidade de infecção em aves residentes e migratórias, em 2007 e 2008. 34,5% dos pássaros amostrados estavam infectados, todos eles com infecções de baixa intensidade compatíveis com a fase crónica. Ao nível do género do parasita, Plasmodium spp. infectou maior número de espécies e atingiu prevalências mais altas que Haemoproteus spp.. A prevalência variou entre espécies de ave e foi afectada por factores diferentes em cada espécie, segundo a biologia do hospedeiro. A idade foi importante para explicar a prevalência no rouxinol-dos-caniços Acrocephalus scirpaceus, reflectindo o facto de os adultos já terem migrado para África e assim terem contactado com duas faunas parasíticas diferentes, acumulando infecções dos seus locais de invernada e nidificação; enquanto os juvenis apenas tinham contactado com a comunidade local de parasitas. A prevalência variou significativamente com a estação do ano para o residente rouxinol-bravo Cettia cetti, que estava mais infectado durante o outono e o inverno. a menor disponibilidade de alimento nos caniçais durante essas estações pode enfraquecer estas aves, tornando-as mais susceptíveis às infecções. Esta tendência foi mais subtil (não estatisticamente significativa) no pardal Passer domesticus, uma ave residente mais generalista, que passa menos tempo no caniçal e pode depender de outras fontes de alimento; de facto, a prevalência no pardal só mostrou diferenças entre anos. A especificidade de hospedeiro das várias linhagens de parasitas foi analisada e comparada com outros casos descritos na literatura. Das nove linhagens de Haemoproteus e 15 de Plasmodium que foram encontradas, só dez linhagens de Plasmodium é que tinham transmissão local confirmada. Cada linhagem demonstrou ter uma preferência de hospedeiro específica. As linhagens especialistas nem sempre partilhavam hospedeiros com as generalistas, formando um padrão de interacções não aninhado. O Plasmodium SGS1 foi a linhagem mais prevalente nas aves amostradas, e também a mais generalista. Em geral, as linhagens com um espectro de hospedeiros mais amplo foram também as que tiveram maiores prevalências, conformando que a capacidade de infectar mais espécies de hospedeiro aumenta a prevalência em todas essas espécies de hospedeiro. Houve uma linhagem (H. MW1) que parecia ser significativamente mais generalista nos locais de estudo do que em estudos anteriores da literatura. Isso sugere que o grau de especialização de um parasita deve ser determinado com cautela, pois pode depender do tipo de hospedeiro que é amostrado. Verificou-se se as comunidades de hemoparasitas são estruturadas geograficamente ao longo das principais rotas migratórias dos seus hospedeiros. Para tal, os parasitas de rouxinóis-dos-caniços e rouxinóis-grandes-dos-caniços Acrocephalus arundinaceus encontrados nos quatro locais de estudo foram comparados com os que foram descritos em quatro locais do leste da Europa. Os quatro sítios portugueses representaram a rota migratória do oeste europeu, enquanto a rota do leste foi representada por quatro sítios na Suécia, Bulgária, Roménia e Rússia, retirados da literatura consultada. Documentaram-se 32 linhagens para estas espécies de hospedeiro na Europa, das quais 14 exclusivamente na rota de leste, 3 exclusivamente na rota do oeste e as restantes 15 eram ocorriam em ambas as rotas. Quando os locais foram comparados dois a dois, nem a distância entre locais nem a rota à qual pertenciam foi suficiente para caracterizar a semelhança entre comunidades de parasitas. Nestes hospedeiros, as comunidades de hemoparasitas apresentam muito pouca estruturação geográfica, pelo que os movimentos migratórios destes hospedeiros não são suficientes para homogeneizar as comunidades parasíticas ao longo das suas rotas migratórias. Talvez esta falta de estrutura seja causada pelos parasitas generalistas, que se dispersam através dos movimentos combinados de várias espécies de hospedeiro. Por este motivo, a adaptação local aos hemoparasitas parece exercer uma pressão selectiva demasiado baixa para moldar a evolução e a manutenção da conectividade migratória destes pássaros. Para testar se as aves exóticas beneficiaram de uma libertação dos seus hemoparasitas, as suas infecções foram comparadas com as infecções de seis espécies locais. As aves exóticas eram infewctadas por menos linhagens e com uma prevalência mais baixa, mas esta diferença não era significativa depois de se controlar a análise para o efeito da filogenia. Havia duas linhagens locais de Plasmodium a infectar as aves exóticas: o generalista P. SGS1 era a linhagem mais prevalente nas espécies nativas, pelo que a sua presença nas exóticas poderia ser esperada por processos aleatórios. P. PADOM01 era mais raro na comunidade amostrada, mas estava presente em pardais natives (filogeneticamente próximos das espécies exóticas infectadas), portanto a sua colonozação dos hospedeiros exóticos deve ter sido ajudada pela sua especialização em aves da família Passeridae. Assim, a hipótese da libertação dos inimigos não parece aplicar-se aos hemoparasitas destas espécies exóticas, pois elas foram infectadas por hemoparasitas locais do mesmo modo que os hospedeiros nativos. A distribuição dos vectores locais de Plasmodium sp. foi estudada, junto com suas relações destes tanto com os parasitas, como com as aves (através das preferências alimentares dos mosquitos). Em três dos locais estudados, as espécies de mosquitos mais abundantes eram Culex pipiens, Cx. theileri e Ochlerotatus caspius. Na Tornada, Coquilletidia richiardii foi muito abundante, mas Cx. theileri e Oc. caspius estiveram ausentes. Foram encontrados Cx. pipiens e Cx. theileri não engurgitados infectados por duas linhagens de transmissão local, P. SGS1 e P. SYAT05 (respectivamente), o que sugere que estes mosquitos podem ser vectores competentes dessas linhagens. A abundância dessas espécies variou significativamente entre locais, o que pode contribuir para as diferenças observadas na prevalência de P. SGS1. Esta linhagem foi detectada na espécie mais abundante de mosquito e tinha alta prevalência nas espécies mais abundantes de pássaros; possivelmente, este parasita precisa de hospedeiros abundantes em todas as fases do seu ciclo de vida, para manter um grande reservatório de infecção em todos os seus estados. Num teste às preferências alimentares envolvendo CO2 e iscos animais na Tornada, Cq. richiardii pareceu ser oportunista. Cx. pipiens pareceu ser mamofílico (contrariamente às descrições anteriores desta espécie), talvez por a ave usada como isco ser desconhecida para os mosquitos locais. A identificação dos dadores de sangue de refeições de mosquito aponta para o estorninho-preto Sturnus unicolor como espécie alvo preferencial dos mosquitos na Tornada.
Description: Tese de doutoramento em Biologia (Ecologia), apresentada à Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia da Universidade de Coimbra
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10316/20273
Rights: openAccess
Appears in Collections:FCTUC Ciências da Vida - Teses de Doutoramento
UC - Dissertações de Mestrado

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
Rita Ventim PhD Thesis.pdf2.05 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
Show full item record

Page view(s)

178
checked on Aug 8, 2022

Download(s) 50

247
checked on Aug 8, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.