Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10316/100778
Title: Infrared Irradiation Drying Impact on Bee Pollen: Case Study on the Phenolic Composition of Eucalyptus globulus Labill and Salix atrocinerea Brot. Pollens
Authors: Campos, Maria G. 
Frigerio, Christian 
Bobiş, Otilia
Urcan, Adriana C.
Gomes, Nelson G. M.
Keywords: bee pollen; cinnamic acid derivatives; food processing; kaempferol glycosides; luteolin; quercetin glycosides; tricetin
Issue Date: 2021
Project: Projeto Estratégico—(UI0204): UIDB/00313/2020 (Portugal) 
Serial title, monograph or event: Processes
Volume: 9
Issue: 5
Abstract: Bee pollen is commonly reputed as a rich source of nutrients, both for bees and humans. Its composition is well balanced and can be taken as a stand-alone food or as supplement, including for the elderly owing its low caloric value. However, storage conditions frequently lead to product degradation, namely due to the high moisture content that enable the proliferation of molds and bacteria. Herein, an infrared (IR)-based technology is proposed as a mean to determine moisture content, setting also a new scalable approach for the development of a drying technology to be used for bee pollen processing, which can be carried out in a short time, without impacting the phenolic and flavonoid content and associated bioactive effects. Proof-of-concept was attained with an IR moisture analyzer, bee pollen samples from Eucalyptus globulus Labill and Salix atrocinerea Brot. being selected as models. Impact of the IR radiation towards the phenolic and flavonoid profiles was screened by HPLC/DAD profiling and radical scavenging ability by the DPPH assay. The IR-based approach shows good reproducibility while simultaneously reducing drying time and energy consumption, thus implying a low environmental impact and being suitable for industrial scale-up once no degradation has been found to occur during the radiation process.Bee pollen is commonly reputed as a rich source of nutrients, both for bees and humans. Its composition is well balanced and can be taken as a stand-alone food or as supplement, including for the elderly owing its low caloric value. However, storage conditions frequently lead to product degradation, namely due to the high moisture content that enable the proliferation of molds and bacteria. Herein, an infrared (IR)-based technology is proposed as a mean to determine moisture content, setting also a new scalable approach for the development of a drying technology to be used for bee pollen processing, which can be carried out in a short time, without impacting the phenolic and flavonoid content and associated bioactive effects. Proof-of-concept was attained with an IR moisture analyzer, bee pollen samples from Eucalyptus globulus Labill and Salix atrocinerea Brot. being selected as models. Impact of the IR radiation towards the phenolic and flavonoid profiles was screened by HPLC/DAD profiling and radical scavenging ability by the DPPH assay. The IR-based approach shows good reproducibility while simultaneously reducing drying time and energy consumption, thus implying a low environmental impact and being suitable for industrial scale-up once no degradation has been found to occur during the radiation process.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10316/100778
ISSN: 2227-9717
DOI: 10.3390/pr9050890
Rights: openAccess
Appears in Collections:I&D CQC - Artigos em Revistas Internacionais
FFUC- Artigos em Revistas Internacionais

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