Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10316/100623
Title: Current Knowledge on the Fungal Degradation Abilities Profiled through Biodeteriorative Plate Essays
Authors: Trovão, João 
Portugal, António 
Keywords: Biodeterioration; Cultural heritage; Deteriorative action; Enzymatic activity; Fungi
Issue Date: 2021
Project: IPN—Financiamento Base FITEC approved under the National Call with reference no. 01/FITEC/2018 
POCI-01-0145-FEDER-PTDC/EPH-PAT/3345/2014 
UIDB/04004/2020 
FCT PhD research grant (SFRH/BD/132523/2017) 
Serial title, monograph or event: Applied Sciences (Switzerland)
Volume: 11
Issue: 9
Abstract: Fungi are known to contribute to the development of drastic biodeterioration of historical and valuable cultural heritage materials. Understandably, studies in this area are increasingly reliant on modern molecular biology techniques due to the enormous benefits they offer. However, classical culture dependent methodologies still offer the advantage of allowing fungal species biodeteriorative profiles to be studied in great detail. Both the essays available and the results concerning distinct fungal species biodeteriorative profiles obtained by amended plate essays, remain scattered and in need of a deep summarization. As such, the present work attempts to provide an overview of available options for this profiling, while also providing a summary of currently known fungal species putative biodeteriorative abilities solely obtained by the application of these methodologies. Conse-quently, this work also provides a series of checklists that can be helpful to microbiologists, restorers and conservation workers when attempting to safeguard cultural heritage materials worldwide from biodeterioration.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10316/100623
ISSN: 2076-3417
DOI: 10.3390/app11094196
Rights: openAccess
Appears in Collections:I&D CFE - Artigos em Revistas Internacionais

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